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Christmas:
Prayers and Customs

Christmas tree
Christmas

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Christmas
Prayers and Customs

Prayers for
the Home


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the New Year

Prayers for
the Family

Feast of
the Epiphany




Advent candle
Advent

A Season
of Preparation


Advent Wreath:
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Meditations for
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About St. Nicholas

Gingerbread

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Site Introduction

 

Customs for Various Countries and Cultures
The Christmas Tree | Prayers around the Tree
Prayer and Ritual for the Christmas Manger

Customs from Various Countries and Cultures

by Victor Hoagland, C.P.

SpacerCenturies ago Christians brought plants and flowers into the celebration of Christmas, for did not Christ come to uphold the dignity of all God's creation? The natural world, as well as humans, angels and animals, should have a part in welcoming him.

SpacerEvergreens, from ancient times symbols of life and eternity, have always had a prominent place in Christian celebrations. Holly, with its green leaves, its prickly points and red berries, suggested that the Child born in the manger would wear a crown of thorns and shed drops of blood. Mistletoe, long associated in the pre-Christian world with healing, became a symbol of the healing power of Christ.

SpacerPoinsettiaThe poinsettia, from Central America, with its bright, star-like flowers, is a natural reminder of the Star of Bethlehem. Other plants that bloom during this season are images also of the Root of David that flowered with new life.

SpacerMany nations have contributed a rich mosaic of Christmas customs. Among the Latin peoples, the Christmas novena, nine days of prayer before Christmas, is a popular tradition. The Christmas meal after midnight Mass, in which all the family participates, is traditional among the French. Among the Slavic peoples on Christmas eve, the father of the family breaks the feastday wafers of bread and gives them to the members of his household, while wishing all the peace of Christmas.

SpacerFrom Ireland came the custom of placing lighted candles in the window during Christmastime. It originated in penal times when the Catholic religion was suppressed in Ireland and priests were forced into hiding. Irish families put a burning candle in their window and left their doors unlatched, hoping that a priest might come to their door and celebrate the Christmas Mass with them.

SpacerOn the feast of the Epiphany, January 6th, the people of South America celebrate the coming of the Three Kings with colorful processions and give gifts on that day.

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The Christmas Tree

Christmas TreeSpacerThe Christmas tree probably originated from popular early medieval religious plays, "the Paradise Plays," performed in churches and town squares of Europe during the Advent season. The plays told the story of the human race from the creation of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Paradise till the Birth of Jesus in Bethlehem. On stage during the play was a great tree hung with apples, symbolizing the Garden of Paradise. Soon people began the custom of putting a "paradise tree" laden with gifts and lighted with candles in their homes during the Christmas season to celebrate paradise regained through the coming of Christ.

SpacerRepresenting many things--the original tree of paradise, the life-giving tree of Christ's cross, the tree John the Apostle saw in the Book of Revelations, "a tree of life, which yields twelve crops of fruit, one for each month of the year...for the healing of the nations"--our Christmas tree is rich in Christian symbolism.

Prayers Around the Christmas Tree

The leader may begin:

In the beginning God made the world and saw it was good. Long ago, God placed a tree in the garden of paradise as his gift to all human beings, a tree of wisdom and knowledge and laden with every good thing. Our Christmas Tree reminds us of that tree. Long ago too, God's kindness appeared in the coming of Christ, who is our hope of eternal life. This tree is a sign of Christ's blessings.

A Reading from the Book of Genesis

This is the story
of the heavens and the earth
after their creation.

When the Lord God made the earth and the heavens,
there was neither shrub nor plan growing on the earth,
because the Lord God had sent no rain;
nor was there anyone to till the ground...

The Lord God formed a human being
from the dust of the ground
and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life,
so that he became a living creature.

The Lord God planted a garden in Eden
away to the east,
and in it he put the man he had formed...
and in the middle of the garden he set the tree of life.
Genesis 2: 4-9

Then all pray:

Tree Poem

 

The lights of the tree are illuminated and a carol may be sung.

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Prayers at a Christmas Manger

The leader may say:

It was St. Francis of Assisi who first popularized the Christmas manger. Wanting to see how Christ was born with his own eyes, he had a stable and some images made before Christmas and then invited his neighbors and frieds to come and join him at his "Bethlehem."

As we look on our manger, may the Christmas story unfold before our eyes, too.

Listen to the Holy Gospel according to Luke:

In those days a decree was issued by the emperor Augustus for a census to be taken throughout the Roman world. This was the first Registration of its kind; it took place when Quirinius was governor of Syria. Everyone made his way to his own town to be registered. Joseph went up to Judaea from the town of Nazareth in Galilee, to register in the city of David called Bethlehem, because he was of the house of David by descent; and with him went Mary, his betrothed, who was expecting her child.

The figures are then placed in the manger, and after a short period of quiet, the reading continues.

MangerWhile they were there, the time came for her to have her baby, and she gave birth to a son, her first born. She wrapped him in swaddling clothes, and laid him in a manger, because there was no room for them in the inn.
Luke 2:1-7

Then all pray:

O God,
whose mighty Son was born in Bethlehem
those days long ago,
lead us to that same poor place,
where Mary laid her tiny Child.
And as we look on in wonder and praise,
make us welcome him in all new life,
see him in the poor,
and care for his handiwork
the earth, the sky and the sea.
O God, bless us again in your great love.
We pray for this through Christ our Lord.
Amen.

A Christmas song may conclude the blessing.

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Prayers and commentary provided by
Passionist Publications and Fr Victor Hoagland, C.P.
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